Catalog Number : A 10116
Net Float – made of bark
Catalog Number : A 10115

Net Float – made of bark

Catalog Number : A 10110
Textile
Catalog Number : A 10109
Textile
Catalog Number : 15957 (formerly 3894)
Accession Number : 213
Greek needle with large eye and decorative tip.
Catalog Number : 2385
Accession Number : 17465
Decorative medical spoon and knife set.
Catalog Number : 2385
Accession Number : 17465
According to Milne this is most likely the handle from a small mirror, perhaps used in medical treatments to observe inside body cavities. It is equally likely to have been used for cosmetic purposes.
Catalog Number : 2385
Accession Number : 17465
Uvula Forceps staphylagra (Greek) An interesting treatment found in the ancient texts refers to the surgical removal of the uvula, using a specialized forceps to hold and crush the uvula before amputation. This procedure was quite common.
Catalog Number : 2385
Accession Number : 17465

Probes/Curettes/Spoons cyathiscomele (Greek); cyathiscomele (Latin) Many probe-style tools had two functional ends to allow the physician to continue working by simply turning the tool around. Many of the probes in this picture have a spoon on one end. Spoons were used medicinally to measure and to heat medicaments and unguents. Spoons with an elongated bowl were likely used to pour warmed or liquid medicaments. Similar spoons found in a domestic setting may have been used for removing and eating varieties of shellfish.

Catalog Number : 2385
Accession Number : 17465

Forceps and Tweezers formiceps, vulsella (Latin) No specific information relating to the larger forceps has been found. It is likely they were used in surgeries of the abdomen to pull or hold back areas of tissue. Smaller forceps or tweezers likely had cosmetic purposes such as removal of facial hair, although some records indicate their use as an aid to remove small polyps and tumors from the nose, skin, etc.