Catalog Number : E17366
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, string, metal nails
This mask may represent Kumugwe, the god of the sea. For more on Kumugwe, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".
Catalog Number : E17365
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, metal nails, string, twine, glass
The dorsal and pectoral fins, jaw, and human face are hinged. The dorsal fin, which is operated via strings, can be lowered to reveal a loon. The whale's eyes are made of blue bottle bases that likely date to the middle of the 19th Century. The whale component has moveable dorsal and pectoral fins and tail. Whale masks are typically quite large and are usually worn over the dancer's back, freeing the dancer's hands to pull strings that would cause the fins and tail to move.
Catalog Number : E17364
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, string, metal nails, cotton cloth band
Jaw of mask is hinged.
Catalog Number : E17363
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, string
Mask has opposable jaw. For more on Raven, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".
Catalog Number : E17362
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, textile, twine, feathers, metal nails
The jaw on this transformation mask is hinged, as is the fish's tail. On the interior of the tail is mounted an image of a human and Sisiutl painted on fabric. Salmon, like whales and other sea creatures, are often associated with clan ancestors or may be servants of the sea god, Kumugwe.
Catalog Number : E17361
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, seal hide, hair, metal nails, string
Though generally shy of people, Buk'wus is a fearsome entity in Kwakiutl mythology. Masks such as this one are generally danced during the T'seka ceremony, though this example is unique owing to the exceptional craftsmanship and the use of hair and hide on the mask. For more on Buk'wus, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".
Catalog Number : E17360
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, metal wire
While Dzunukwa is a fearsome supernatural creature with a reputation for eating children, she is also thought to be slow moving and sleepy, thus allowing many of her would be victims to escape or outwit the supernatural creature. For more on Dzunukwa, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".
Catalog Number : E17359
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, hair, hide, string, metal nails
The quality of workmanship and hair on this piece suggest it was a chiefly mask. If so, it may not have been danced, as is generally the case with such elite masks, and was instead used at the end of a potlatch to symbolize great wealth and power. For more on Dzunukwa, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".
Catalog Number : E17358
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, metal nails, string
Fool dancers, along with dancers dressed as grizzly bears, make sure that proper etiquette is enforced during potlatches. For more on the Noohlmahl, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".
Catalog Number : E17357
Accession Number : 4615
Material : Wood, paint, cedar bark, cotton cloth, horse hair, hide
Fool dancers, along with dancers dressed as grizzly bears, make sure that proper etiquette is enforced during potlatches. For more on the Noohlmahl, see the section entitled "Kwakiutl Cosmology".